Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
JIB
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

New Technique May Lead to Rejection-Free Adult Stem Cells

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 14 Aug 2012
Patient-specific, blood-producing stem cells could soon be generated in the laboratory, eliminating the need for harvesting bone marrow--or finding a matching donor--for patients needing a bone marrow transplant. German scientists have generated blood-forming stem cells from pluripotent stem cells in the laboratory without using animal serum, a technique that could lead to the production of rejection-free adult stem cells.

Researchers Dr. Bernhard Schiedlmeier and Hannes Klump led the study, which was published August 6, 2012, in the journal STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

The scientists used mouse embryonic stem cells to grow blood-forming stem cells in low-oxygen conditions in the lab without using any serum or supportive cells known as stroma. When they transplanted the blood-forming cells into mice, they found the cells were capable of rebuilding the mice’s blood-forming system.

This findings means that scientists may ultimately be able to create blood stem cells from transplant patients in a laboratory instead of than using stem cells from unrelated donors, avoiding hazardous graft versus host reactions. “If our protocol can be adapted to humans and combined with induced pluripotent stem cell technology, it will open the door to producing adult stem cells that a patient’s body should not reject,” Dr. Klump said.

“These researchers have made progress toward the idea of one day using a patient’s own skin cells, or other cell types, to make blood-producing cells in the laboratory,” said Anthony Atala, MD, editor of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Winston-Salem, NC, USA). “These findings are important for the translational aspects of using iPS cells.”

Dr. Schiedlmeier works in the department of experimental biology at Hannover Medical School (Germany) and Dr. Klump works at the Institute for Transfusion Medicine at University Hospital Essen (Germany).

Related Links:

Hannover Medical School
University Hospital Essen




comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: A leukemia cell coated with antibody is marked for destruction by activated natural killer cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Southern California).

Leukemia Cells Are Killed in Culture by Immune Cells Grown from the Same Patient

Immune system natural killer (NK) cells were isolated from leukemia patients, expanded in culture, and then shown in an in vitro system to attack and destroy cancer cells from the original cell donors.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Texas, Austin).

Experimental Drug Kills Cancer Cells by Interfering with Their Ion Transport Mechanism

An experimental anticancer drug induces cells to enter a molecular pathway leading to apoptosis by skewing their ion transport systems to greatly favor the influx of chloride anions. To promote development... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Liver cells regenerated in mice treated with a new drug (right) compared with a control group (center) after partial liver removal. Healthy liver cells are shown at left (Photo courtesy of Marshall et al, 2014, the Journal of Experimental Medicine).

New Drug Triggers Liver Regeneration After Surgery

Investigators have revealed that an innovative complement inhibitor decreases complement-mediated liver cell death, and actually stimulates postsurgery liver regrowth in mice. Liver cancer often results... Read more

Business

view channel

Partnership Established to Decode Bowel Disease

23andMe (Mountain View, CA,USA), a personal genetics company, is collaborating with Pfizer, Inc. (New York, NY, USA), in which the companies will seek to enroll 10,000 people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a research project designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity,... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.