Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH MEDIA

New Study Using MR Technology to Revolutionize Disease Research

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 26 Dec 2013
Image: The Siemens’ Magnetom Aera 1.5T MRI system (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthcare).
Image: The Siemens’ Magnetom Aera 1.5T MRI system (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthcare).
Image: The MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthcare).
Image: The MAGNETOM Skyra 3T MRI (Photo courtesy of Siemens Healthcare).
A world-leading health research resource based in the United Kingdom is establishing an imaging study to help scientists gain a more comprehensive determination of a wide range of diseases including cancer, dementia, and bone, heart, and brain disorders.

Utilizing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) capabilities of a Magnetom Aera and a Magnetom Skyra, developed by Siemens Healthcare (Erlangen, Germany), UK Biobank (Manchester, UK) expects their research project to be the most thorough study of its kind ever conducted. The MR systems will be used to obtain the vital translational research images of the study participants’ hearts and brains. Bone scans and scanning of the carotid artery (in the neck) are also planned.

In the most part funded by the UK Department of Health, Medical Research Council, and Wellcome Trust charity, UK Biobank will track the health of 500,000 British citizens over many years. The imaging part of the project, due to take place in spring 2014, will be the first time researchers have endeavored to image so many people in a single study. It is expected that the research will provide further data for scientists and clinicians trying to develop a better understanding of disorders that cause disability, pain, and premature death.

The Magnetom Aera and Skyra MR systems feature 48 radiofrequency (RF) channels as standard and lightweight coils. The systems’ open bore design with a 70-cm-wide aperture, allows a wide range of body types to be scanned either head or feet first, substantially optimizing comfort for the study participants. The systems also feature TimTM 4G (Total imaging matrix) and DotTM (Day optimizing throughput) technology integration for high-resolution imaging, improved efficiency, and enhanced productivity.

“UK Biobank is the major health research success story of recent decades. Our 500,000 participants have already provided lots of information about their health, lifestyles, and wellbeing, as well as blood, urine, and saliva samples for long-term storage and analysis, including genetic research,” noted Prof. Rory Collins, lead investigator at UK Biobank. “Adding this detailed extra information will help in many ways. For instance, it may help to identify early changes that indicate the start of disease, and it may suggest new ways to slow that process, or to prevent the disease altogether.”

“Siemens MR technology is already pivotal to many imaging research projects across the UK and we are delighted to take this one step further by taking part in one of the most detailed imaging studies of its kind,” stated Jane Kilkenny, MR business manager at Siemens Healthcare. “We look forward to supporting the project with the Magnetom Aera and Skyra’s excellent image quality and rapid acquisition times, with the end goal of producing images of a quality that can help with pioneering research into the cause and treatment of major diseases.”

UK Biobank is hosted by the University of Manchester (UK) and supported by the National Health Service (NHS). It works with researchers from a large number of British universities. The medical research project is a nonprofit charity and had initial funding of approximately GBP 62 million.

Related Links:

Siemens Healthcare
UK Biobank



Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: Pluristem technicians produce PLacental eXpanded (PLX) cells in the company\'s state-of-the-art facility (Photo courtesy of Pluristem Therapeutics).

Placental Cells Secrete Factors That Protect Nerves from Ischemic Damage

Cells derived from placenta have been found to protect PC12 cells—rat-derived cells that behave similarly to and are used as stand-ins to study human nerve cells—in a culture-based ischemic stroke model.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Researchers have attached two drugs—TRAIL and Dox—onto graphene strips. TRAIL is most effective when delivered to the external membrane of a cancer cell, while Dox is most effective when delivered to the nucleus, so the researchers designed the system to deliver the drugs sequentially, with each drug hitting a cancer cell where it will do the most damage (Photo courtesy of Dr. Zhen Gu, North Carolina State University).

Anticancer Drug Delivery System Utilizes Graphene Strip Transporters

The ongoing search by cancer researchers for targeted drug delivery systems has generated a novel approach that uses graphene strips to transport simultaneously the anticancer agents TRAIL (tumor necrosis... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Cancer cells infected with tumor-targeted oncolytic virus (red). Green indicates alpha-tubulin, a cell skeleton protein. Blue is DNA in the cancer cell nuclei (Photo courtesy of Dr. Rathi Gangeswaran, Bart’s Cancer Institute).

Innovative “Viro-Immunotherapy” Designed to Kill Breast Cancer Cells

A leading scientist has devised a new treatment that employs viruses to kill breast cancer cells. The research could lead to a promising “viro-immunotherapy” for patients with triple-negative breast cancer,... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: MIT researchers have designed a microfluidic device that allows them to precisely trap pairs of cells (one red, one green) and observe how they interact over time (Photo courtesy of Burak Dura, MIT).

New Device Designed to See Communication between Immune Cells

The immune system is a complicated network of many different cells working together to defend against invaders. Effectively combating an infection depends on the interactions between these cells.... Read more

Business

view channel

Program Designed to Provide High-Performance Computing Cluster Systems for Bioinformatics Research

Dedicated Computing (Waukesha, WI, USA), a global technology company, reported that it will be participating in the Intel Cluster Ready program to deliver integrated high-performance computing cluster solutions to the life sciences market. Powered by Intel Xeon processors, Dedicated Computing is providing a range of... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.