Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH MEDIA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

New Diabetes Drug Fights Obesity While Controlling Glucose Metabolism

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 11 Nov 2013
A synthetic peptide that targets receptors for the naturally occurring incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP is being developed into a drug for the management of diseases associated with impaired glucose tolerance.

Incretins are a group of gastrointestinal hormones that cause an increase in the amount of insulin released from the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans after eating, even before blood glucose levels become elevated. They also slow the rate of absorption of nutrients into the blood stream by reducing gastric emptying and may directly reduce food intake. They also inhibit glucagon release from the alpha cells of the Islets of Langerhans.

The two main candidate molecules that fulfill criteria for an incretin are glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide or GIP). Both GLP-1 and GIP are rapidly inactivated by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4).

Investigators at Indiana University (Bloomington, USA) developed a "unimolecular dual incretin" derived from an intermixed peptide sequence from GLP-1 and GIP. They reported in the October 30, 2013, online edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine that this compound corrected two causal mechanisms of diabetes-linked obesity, i.e., adiposity-induced insulin resistance and pancreatic insulin deficiency, more effectively than did selective mono-agonists. This superior efficacy translated across rodent models of obesity and diabetes, including db/db mice and ZDF rats, to primates (cynomolgus monkeys and humans).

"The current study demonstrates clearly that combining GLP-1 and GIP can produce improved therapeutic effects," said contributing author Dr. Richard DiMarchi, professor of chemistry at Indiana University. "It achieved results comparable to those that resulted from a 10-fold higher dose of agents that target only GLP-1 receptors."

"The results demonstrate that GLP-1 and GIP, when built into a single molecule, provide synergistic activity to control glucose and lower body weight across a spectrum of animal models, including in human clinical experiments," said Dr. DiMarchi. "Currently approved drugs are quite effective, but they are insufficient in normalizing glucose, and they certainly do not cause much loss of body weight."

Clinical trials conducted by Roche (Basel, Switzerland) demonstrated a decrease in glucose levels beyond what would be expected from conventional treatment. However, the six-week trial was not of significant duration to provide definitive evidence about weight loss in humans.

Related Links:

Indiana University
Roche 



Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: The bone marrow of mice with normal ether lipid production (top) contains more white blood cells than are found in the bone marrow of mice with ether lipid deficiency (bottom) (Photo courtesy of Washington University School of Medicine).

Inactivating Fatty Acid Synthase Reduces Inflammation by Interfering with Neutrophil Membrane Function

The enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) was shown to regulate inflammation by sustaining neutrophil viability through modulation of membrane phospholipid composition. Neutrophils are the most abundant... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Cancer cells infected with tumor-targeted oncolytic virus (red). Green indicates alpha-tubulin, a cell skeleton protein. Blue is DNA in the cancer cell nuclei (Photo courtesy of Dr. Rathi Gangeswaran, Bart’s Cancer Institute).

Innovative “Viro-Immunotherapy” Designed to Kill Breast Cancer Cells

A leading scientist has devised a new treatment that employs viruses to kill breast cancer cells. The research could lead to a promising “viro-immunotherapy” for patients with triple-negative breast cancer,... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: MIT researchers have designed a microfluidic device that allows them to precisely trap pairs of cells (one red, one green) and observe how they interact over time (Photo courtesy of Burak Dura, MIT).

New Device Designed to See Communication between Immune Cells

The immune system is a complicated network of many different cells working together to defend against invaders. Effectively combating an infection depends on the interactions between these cells.... Read more

Business

view channel

Biotech Acquisition Designed to Accelerate the Development and Marketing of Immunosequencing Applications

Adaptive Biotechnologies Corp. (Seattle, WA, USA), a developer of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to profile T-cell and B-cell receptors, has acquired of Sequenta, Inc. (South San Francisco, CA, USA), which is expected to expedite and expand the use of innovative immunosequencing technology for researchers and clinicians... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.