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RANDOX LABORATORIES

Biomimetic Nanoparticles Prove Effective for Biotherapeutic Drug Transport

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 19 Mar 2018
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Image: The process of extracting proteolipid material, protein enrichment, and vesicular formulation of leukosomes (Photo courtesy of the Houston Methodist Research Institute).
Image: The process of extracting proteolipid material, protein enrichment, and vesicular formulation of leukosomes (Photo courtesy of the Houston Methodist Research Institute).
Nanoparticles coated with proteins from immune system leukocytes were shown to provide an effective transport and delivery system for biotherapeutic drugs.

Though the advantages of transferring biological features from cells to synthetic nanoparticles for drug delivery purposes have recently been reported, a standardizable, batch-to-batch consistent, scalable, and high-throughput assembly method is required to further develop these platforms.

In a paper published in the March 7, 2018, online edition of the journal Advanced Materials, investigators at the Houston Methodist Research Institute (TX, USA) described the preparation of biomimetic "leukosome" nanoparticles that incorporated membrane proteins within the particles' bilayer. The nanoparticles were fabricated using a microfluidic-based platform.

Evaluation of the NA-Leuko nanoparticles revealed that they showed extended shelf life and retention of the biological functions of donor cells (i.e., macrophage avoidance and targeting of inflamed vasculature).

"The body is so smart in the ways it defends itself. The immune system will eventually recognize nanoparticles no matter how well you make them," said senior author Dr. Ennio Tasciotti, professor of biomimetic medicine at the Houston Methodist Research Institute. "In my lab, we make nanoparticles out of the cell membrane of the very same immune cells that patrol the blood stream. When we put these biomimetic, or bioinspired, nanoparticles back in the body, the immune cells do not recognize them as something different, as they are made of their same building blocks, so there is no adverse response."

"While our lab will remain fully devoted to this line of research, if somebody else develops some solutions using our protocols that are useful in clinical care, it's still a good outcome," said Dr. Tasciotti. "After all, the ultimate reason why we are in translational science is for the benefit of the patients."

Related Links:
Houston Methodist Research Institute


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