Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
PZ HTL SA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Possible Target for Gene Therapy May Correct Cardiac Hypertrophy

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 19 May 2014
Image: Left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy in short axis view (Photo courtesy of Patrick Lynch).
Image: Left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy in short axis view (Photo courtesy of Patrick Lynch).
A deficit in the expression of the protein Erbin (ErbB2 interacting protein) has been linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

The gene that encodes the Erbin protein is a member of the leucine-rich repeat and PDZ domain (LAP) family. The encoded Erbin protein contains 17 leucine-rich repeats and one PDZ domain. It binds to the unphosphorylated form of the ERBB2 protein and regulates ERBB2 function and localization. Erbin's C-terminal PDZ domain is able to bind to ErbB2, a protein tyrosine kinase which is often associated with poor prognosis during the development of skin cancer. Its N-terminal region has been shown to affect the Ras signaling pathway by disrupting Ras-Raf interaction.

Investigators at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel) looked at Erbin levels in humans and animals with and without cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, they genetically engineered a line of mice to lack the Erbin gene.

They reported in the April 22, 2014, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) that there was down-regulation of Erbin expression in biopsies derived from human failing hearts.

In mouse models cardiac hypertrophy was induced either by isoproterenol administration or by aortic constriction. In both models the level of Erbin was significantly decreased. The genetically engineered Erbin knockout mice rapidly developed decompensated cardiac hypertrophy and following severe pressure overload, all of these mice died from heart failure (compared to only about 30% mortality observed in the control group).

It is known that Erbin inhibited Ras-mediated activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by binding to the protein Soc-2 suppressor of clear homolog (Shoc2). The data obtained during this study showed that ERK phosphorylation was enhanced in the heart tissues of the Erbin knockout mice. Furthermore, Erbin associated with Shoc2 in both whole hearts and in cardiomyocytes, and that in the absence of Erbin, Raf was phosphorylated and bound to Shoc2, resulting in ERK phosphorylation.

The investigators concluded that, "Erbin is an inhibitor of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, and this inhibition is mediated, at least in part, by modulating ERK signaling. We describe a cardioprotective role for Erbin, which suggests it is a potential target for cardiac gene therapy."

Related Links:

Hebrew University of Jerusalem



SLAS - Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
BIOSIGMA S.R.L.
RANDOX LABORATORIES
comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Drug Discovery

view channel

Omega 3 Found to Improve Behavior in Children with ADHD

Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a specific kind of have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Moreover, these findings indicate that a customized cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD. Statistics show that 3%–6%... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: On target: When researchers introduced nanobodies they made to cells engineered to express a tagged version of a protein in skeletal fibers known as tubulin (red), the nanobodies latched on. The cells above have recently divided (Photo courtesy of Rockefeller University).

Turning Antibodies into Precisely Tuned Nanobodies

New technology has the potential to create nanobodies making them much more accessible than antibodies for all sorts of research. Antibodies control the process of recognizing and zooming in on molecular... Read more

Business

view channel

Two Industry Partnerships Initiated to Fuel Neuroscience Research

Faster, more complex neural research is now attainable by combining technology from two research companies. Blackrock Microsystems, LLC (Salt Lake City, UT, USA), a developer of neuroscience research equipment, announced partnerships with two neuroscience research firms—PhenoSys, GmbH (Berlin, Germany) and NAN Instruments, Ltd.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.