Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
JIB
BioConferenceLive

Future Chemotherapy Could Target Tumor Cell Social Interactions

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 11 Oct 2012
Collections of cancer cells - tumors- display many characteristics of communal communication and social interaction that typify collections of bacterial cells, and an international team of theoretical biologists have suggested that development of new cancer treatments should be based on attacking tumors at the level of these social interactions.

Investigators at Rice University (Houston, TX, USA), Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD, USA), and Tel Aviv University (Israel) suggested in a paper published in the September 2012 issue of the journal Trends in Microbiology that the communal behavior of bacteria represent a valuable model system for new perspectives and research directions in cancer chemotherapy. As an example they site the behavior of some types of cancer that revert to a dormant, unresponsive state when challenged by drug treatment. Absence of the drug stimulates a signaling process that reawakens the tumor.

“Cancer is a sophisticated enemy. There is growing evidence that cancer cells use advanced communications to work together to enslave normal cells, create metastases, resist drugs, and decoy the body’s immune system,” said first author Dr. Eshel Ben-Jacob, professor of physics at Tel Aviv University. “If we can break the communication code, we may be able to prevent the cells from going dormant or to reawaken them for a well-timed chemotherapeutic attack. This is just one example. Our extensive studies of the social lives of bacteria suggest a number of others, including sending signals that trigger the cancer cells to turn upon themselves and kill one another.”

Related Links:

Rice University
Johns Hopkins University
Tel Aviv University



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: Microcomputed tomography images (top) and histology images (bottom) of the knees of mice fed a very high fat diet containing omega-3 fatty acid supplement (left) or only omega-6 fatty acids (right) after a knee injury. The omega-6 diet showed abnormal bone remodeling and calcified tissue formation in the joint (white arrow). The omega-6 diet also showed significant loss of cartilage (red staining, yellow arrowhead) and increased joint inflammation (Photo courtesy of Duke University).

Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Moderate Severity of Osteoarthritis in a Mouse Model

Researchers working with an osteoarthritis (OA) obese mouse model found that the fat content of the animals' diet contributed more to the development or arrest of OA than did body weight.... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel

Vaccine Being Developed for Heart Disease Close to Reality

The world’s first vaccine for heart disease is becoming a possibility with researchers demonstrating significant arterial plaque reduction in concept testing in mice. Klaus Ley, MD, from the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LA Jolla, CA, USA), and a vascular immunology specialist, is leading the vaccine... Read more

Business

view channel

A Surge in IPOs Revitalize Investments for the Global Pharma and Biotech

Anti-infective drugs, oncology, and pharmaceutical contract laboratories attract the most investment up to now. The intensified private equity and venture capital (PEVC) deal activity in the global healthcare industry during the recession years, 2008–2010, witnessed a waning post-2010. However, the decline in deals... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.