Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Demo Company

Common Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Associated With Decreased Risk of Skin Cancer

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 12 Jun 2012
Print article
A new study has found an association linking the use of various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with a decreased risk of two major types of skin cancer.

Researchers at Aarhus University Hospital (Aarhus, Denmark) undertook a retrospective, population-based case-control study of patients in Northern Denmark to examine the association between use of NSAIDs--including aspirin, ibuprofin, and naproxen--and the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and malignant melanoma (MM). Analysis of medical records from northern Denmark from 1991 through 2009 identified 1,974 diagnoses of SSC, 13,316 diagnoses of BCC, and 3,242 diagnoses of MM. Drug use information (including prescription data) from these patients was compared with information from 178,655 individuals without skin cancer.

Statistical analyses indicated that individuals who filled more than two prescriptions for NSAIDs had a 15% decreased risk for developing SCC and a 13% decreased risk for developing MM than those who filled two or fewer prescriptions for the medications, especially when the drugs were taken for seven or more years or taken at high intensity. Taking NSAIDs did not seem to reduce the risk of developing BCC in general, although there was a 15% and 21% reduced risk of developing BCC on less-exposed sites (body areas other than the head and neck) when the drugs were taken long term or at high intensity, respectively.

The main SCC and MM risk-reducers in the study were nonselective NSAIDs and older COX-2 inhibitors (diclofenac, etodolac, and meloxicam). NSAIDs are thought to help prevent the development of cancer by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are known to be involved in carcinogenesis.

“We hope that the potential cancer-protective effect of NSAIDs will inspire more research on skin cancer prevention,” said first author Sigrún Alba Jóhannesdóttir, BSc, of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Aarhus University Hospital; “Also, [this] effect should be taken into account when discussing benefits and harms of NSAID use.”

Related Links:
Aarhus University Hospital

Print article



view channel
Image: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (Photo courtesy of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine).

How Blocking TROY Signaling Slows Brain Cancer Growth

Cancer researchers have found how the low molecular weight drug propentofylline (PPF) slows the growth of the aggressive brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This form of brain cancer is the most... Read more


view channel
Image: A partially completed three-dimensional printed airway from nostril to trachea with fine structure of the nasal cavity showing (Photo courtesy of Dr. Rui Ni, Pennsylvania State University).

The Structure of the Nasal Cavity Channels Food Smells into the Nose and Avoids the Lungs

Three-dimensional printing technology was used to create a model of the nasal cavity that enabled researchers to demonstrate why the smell of food goes into the nose rather than down into the lungs.... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image:  The BioSpa 8 Automated Incubator (Photo courtesy of BioTek Instruments).

Smart Incubator System Automates Live Cell Assay Operations

A new instrument that automates laboratory workflow by linking microplate washers and dispensers with readers and imaging systems is now available for biotech and other life sciences researchers.... Read more


view channel

Purchase of Biopharmaceutical Company Will Boost Development of Nitroxyl-Based Cardiovascular Disease Drugs

A major international biopharmaceutical company has announced the acquisition of a private biotech company that specializes in the development of drugs for treatment of cardiovascular disease. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (New York, NY, USA) has initiated the process to buy Cardioxyl Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Chapel Hill, NC, USA).... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.