Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Demo Company

New Imaging Workstation Provides Superior Sensitivity for Gel/Blot Analyses

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 08 Jan 2013
Print article
Image: The PXi Multiapplication gel and blot imaging system (Photo courtesy of Syngene).
Image: The PXi Multiapplication gel and blot imaging system (Photo courtesy of Syngene).
A new high resolution, multiapplication imaging system includes a wide range of lighting options, a new-generation camera, and specialized software, enabling exceptional sensitivity for analysis of gels and blots.

The PXi gel and blot imaging system from Syngene (Frederick, MD, USA) is a sophisticated and easy-to-use, compact workstation for the capture and image analysis of chemiluminescent and fluorescent blots, fluorescent and IR gels, visible gels and blots, and even 2D gels. PXi is available in three versions - with a 4, 6, or 8 million pixel high performance camera and suitable lens that results in the system having superior sensitivity such that even faint gels, chemiluminescence blots, and faint fluorescent bands can be imaged. In addition, the cameras are cooled to enable longer exposures, which can be a necessity for chemiluminescence and for some fluorescence applications.

The high performance range of PXi has been designed to provide a high level of control and to excel at a wide range of applications. The system has options for advanced automation or manual control. A number of lighting options can be utilized including plug and play LED modules for Red, Green, Blue and IR light. These novel lighting systems provides the user with the ability to perform colored fluorescent, multiplex, and colorimetric imaging. The new UltraSlim blue LED transilluminator provides a solution for imaging “safe dyes.” An integral 7-position filter wheel can accommodate a wide range of Syngene filters. PXi is controlled by the GeneSys acquisition and capture software. Using its database, GeneSys can automatically configure PXi to capture any type of image.

Related Links:


Print article



view channel
Image: Left: Green actin fibers create architecture of the cell. Right: With cytochalasin D added, actin fibers disband and reform in the nuclei (Photo courtesy of the University of North Carolina).

Actin in the Nucleus Triggers a Process That Directs Stem Cells to Mature into Bone

A team of cell biologists has discovered why treatment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with the mycotoxin cytochalasin D directs them to mature into bone cells (osteoblasts) rather than into fat cells... Read more


view channel

Molecular Light Shed on “Dark” Cellular Receptors

Scientists have created a new research tool to help find homes for orphan cell-surface receptors, toward better understanding of cell signaling, developing new therapeutics, and determining causes of drug side-effects. The approach may be broadly useful for discovering interactions of orphan receptors with endogenous, naturally... Read more


view channel

Purchase of Biopharmaceutical Company Will Boost Development of Nitroxyl-Based Cardiovascular Disease Drugs

A major international biopharmaceutical company has announced the acquisition of a private biotech company that specializes in the development of drugs for treatment of cardiovascular disease. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (New York, NY, USA) has initiated the process to buy Cardioxyl Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Chapel Hill, NC, USA).... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.