Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
JIB
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

New Module Enables Super-Resolution Microscopy of Cell Organelles in Three Dimensions

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 20 Nov 2013
Image: The ELYRA super-resolution microscope system enables 3D-PALM imagery (Photo courtesy of Zeiss).
Image: The ELYRA super-resolution microscope system enables 3D-PALM imagery (Photo courtesy of Zeiss).
Biotech researchers and other life scientists who employ advanced microscopy techniques are now able to move up to a state-of-the-art super-resolution microscopy system.

Zeiss (Jena, Germany) has introduced ELYRA P.1, a new module that makes possible three-dimensional (3D) super-resolution photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) for endogenously-expressed photo-switchable fluorescent proteins.

In PALM, photo-switchable fluorescent molecules are sparsely activated so that only one out of many will be in its on-state within a single point spread function (PSF). In 3D, the PSF shape codes for the z-position. The localizations are plotted in a new image to create the super-resolved image. ELYRA P.1 achieves resolutions in the range of 20–30 nanometers laterally and 50–80 nanometers axially. The ELYRA P.1 module captures highly resolved structures in 3D, while treating the sample so gently that it remains available for long-term observation.

The ELYRA system can be integrated with the Zeiss laser scanning microscopes LSM 710 or LSM 780. In addition, ELYRA works seamlessly together with Zeiss scanning electron microscopes.

“With ELYRA, researchers can investigate the structural arrangement of one or multiple proteins, reveal the ultrastructure of cell organelles in 2D and 3D as well as map and count molecules within a structure. Sophisticated algorithms relate photon statistics to precision information in all directions, so researchers can display their structures fully rendered in 3D,” said Dr. Klaus Weisshart, ELYRA product manager at Zeiss.

Related Links:

Zeiss



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: A leukemia cell coated with antibody is marked for destruction by activated natural killer cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Southern California).

Leukemia Cells Are Killed in Culture by Immune Cells Grown from the Same Patient

Immune system natural killer (NK) cells were isolated from leukemia patients, expanded in culture, and then shown in an in vitro system to attack and destroy cancer cells from the original cell donors.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Texas, Austin).

Experimental Drug Kills Cancer Cells by Interfering with Their Ion Transport Mechanism

An experimental anticancer drug induces cells to enter a molecular pathway leading to apoptosis by skewing their ion transport systems to greatly favor the influx of chloride anions. To promote development... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Liver cells regenerated in mice treated with a new drug (right) compared with a control group (center) after partial liver removal. Healthy liver cells are shown at left (Photo courtesy of Marshall et al, 2014, the Journal of Experimental Medicine).

New Drug Triggers Liver Regeneration After Surgery

Investigators have revealed that an innovative complement inhibitor decreases complement-mediated liver cell death, and actually stimulates postsurgery liver regrowth in mice. Liver cancer often results... Read more

Business

view channel

Partnership Established to Decode Bowel Disease

23andMe (Mountain View, CA,USA), a personal genetics company, is collaborating with Pfizer, Inc. (New York, NY, USA), in which the companies will seek to enroll 10,000 people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a research project designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity,... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.