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Non-DEHP and Phthalate-Free Tubing Now Available for Routine Laboratory Applications

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 27 Aug 2013
A major European manufacturer of high-performance flexible tubing and other plastic laboratory products has introduced a bio-based, phthalate-free product for use in routine laboratory applications.

Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics (Paris, France) the manufacturer of Tygon high-performance flexible tubing, has recently introduced a bio-based, phthalate-free product. DEHP Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate), a common plasticizer, has been removed from existing Tygon formulations.

The next-generation DEHP- and phthalate-free Tygon S3 tubing is made with a bio-based plasticizer and the product’s new sustainable formulations are biodegradable and deliver superior pump life. For example, Tygon S3 E-3603 non-DEHP tubing was specially formulated for resistance to flex-fatigue and abrasion. In many peristaltic pump applications, it outlasts the original R-3603 by a factor of three to one. As tubing for an instrumentation connection, vent, drain and other general laboratory applications, Tygon S3 E-3603 Tubing offers superior life, which minimizes the labor and expense of replacement.

New Tygon S3 formulations include Tygon S3 E-3603 General Laboratory Tubing and Tygon S3 E-LFL Long Flexible Life Tubing. Tygon R-1000 has also been replaced by Tygon E-1000, soft and flexible non-DEHP tubing.

“The change to non-DEHP tubing is integral to the company’s continued efforts toward safety, compliance, and sustainability,” said Katia May, laboratory market manager for Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics. “Saint-Gobain is the first manufacturer to remove DEHP and phthalates from tubing products for laboratory applications and beyond. We are committed to providing superior, smart, safe, and sustainable flexible tubing with unsurpassed performance.”

Related Links:

Saint-Gobain


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