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Precision and Ease-of-Use Characterize New Line of Microcentrifuges

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 30 Jul 2013
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Image: The Microfuge 20 micro-centrifuge (Photo courtesy of Beckman Coulter Life Sciences).
Image: The Microfuge 20 micro-centrifuge (Photo courtesy of Beckman Coulter Life Sciences).
A new line of microcentrifuges was designed to meet the specific requirements of a wide range of research applications while being efficient and easy to use.

The Beckman Coulter Life Sciences (Indianapolis, IN, USA) Microfuge 20 and 20R microcentrifuges are compact instruments that provide flexibility and reliable, precise performance whether in refrigerated (the Microfuge 20R) or nonrefrigerated (Microfuge 20) mode of operation. These microcentrifuges are intended for a wide range of biotech research applications including nucleic acid and protein preparation; pelleting, extractions, purifications, concentrations, phase separations and receptor binding; and rapid sedimentation of protein precipitates, particulates, and cell debris. An easy-to-use interface facilitates entry and recall of up to 10 user-defined programs.

Samples can be processed at speeds up to 15,000 rpm (20,627 x g) and the temperature in the Microfuge 20R can be adjusted over a range of -10 to +40 degrees Celsius. Fixed angle rotors are made of polypropylene or aluminum and offer capacities of 24 or 36 microcentrifuge tubes or four PCR tube strips.

“The Microfuge 20 series provides researchers with an accurate, reliable, and durable microcentrifuge,” said David Rolwing, centrifuge product manager at Beckman Coulter Life Sciences. “Strong performance and ergonomic features combine in these units to provide confidence and efficiency.”

Related Links:
Beckman Coulter Life Sciences

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