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System Detects Novel Interaction Partners for Membrane Proteins

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 14 Jun 2013
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Image: The Dualmembrane Kit for identification and investigation of membrane protein interaction partners (Photo courtesy of Dualsystems Biotech AG).
Image: The Dualmembrane Kit for identification and investigation of membrane protein interaction partners (Photo courtesy of Dualsystems Biotech AG).
A system detects interactions involving integral membrane proteins or membrane-associated proteins, facilitating the identification of novel interaction partners and the investigation of interaction domains.

Dualsystems Biotech AG (Schlieren, Switzerland) introduces its “DUALmembrane System” to detect pairwise protein interactions, identify novel protein interactions by cDNA library screening, investigate ternary complexes, and map interaction domains. The system is available in both convenient kit form and as a custom screening service. The DUALmembrane System reliably detects interactions between integral membrane proteins and receptor subunits and coreceptors as well as membrane-associated proteins and soluble proteins. The system is based on properties of ubiquitin, the small protein modifier conserved in eukaryotes that plays a primary role in protein degradation.

The DUALmembrane Kit screens full-length integral membrane proteins for interactions in vivo under the physiological conditions at the membrane, with novel interactions identified through screening of cDNA libraries. The range of available cDNA libraries has recently been significantly broadened by DUALsystems for screening of human tissues, animal tissues, plant cells, and microorganisms. The kit also enables easy subcloning of full-length cDNA inserts using Sfi I technology.

With the DUALmembrane Custom Screening Service, researchers can also save time and money by leveraging Dualsystems Biotech’s extensive experience and expertise in identifying novel interaction partners for proteins of interest. Custom screening is particularly useful for detecting weak or transient interactions.

Related Links:

Dualsystems Biotech
For Membrane Proteins

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