Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH MEDIA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Restorative Gel Could Help Reverse Paralysis

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 28 May 2013
A biodegradable implant that delivers a therapeutic gel could help restore healthy nerve function in degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

Researchers at Tel Aviv University (Israel) developed the implant, which is a soft, biodegradable tube that serves as a physical bridge to help the nerve ends connect. Lining the inside of the biodegradable tube is a guiding regeneration gel (GRG), a transparent, highly viscous, malleable, and adaptable gel that increases nerve growth and healing, helping the severed nerve ends to rejoin. But the GRG not only aids reconnection and cell preservation, it can also support their survival while being used for therapy and transplantation.

The key to the regeneration process lies in the composition of the gel, with three main components: superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidants, which exhibit high anti-inflammatory activities; synthetic laminin-derived peptides, which act as a railway or track for the nerve fibers to grow along; and hyaluronic acid, commonly found in the human fetus, which serves as a buffer against drying, a major danger for most implants. These components allow the nerve to heal the way a fetus does in the womb - quickly and smoothly.

Research to-date has shown that GRG stimulates cell growth, neuronal sprouting, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation, supporting cells in vitro and in vivo upon implantation. It also supports three dimensional (3D) growth and differentiation of various cell types (embryonic, adult stem cells, and preneuronal cells). The implications for therapeutic applications include peripheral nerves reconstruction, cell therapy, corneal preservation, wound healing, and as a postirradiation tissue cavity filler.

“The implant has already been tested in animal models, and the gel by itself can be used as a stand-alone product, acting as an aid to cell therapy,” said GRG codeveloper Shimon Rochkind, MD. “When grown in the gel, cells show excellent development, as well as intensive fiber growth. This could have implications for the treatment of diseases such as Parkinson's.”

Related Links:

Tel Aviv University



Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: The photo shows a mouse pancreatic islet as seen by light microscopy. Beta cells can be recognized by the green insulin staining. Glucagon is labeled in red and the nuclei in blue (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

Regenerative Potential Is a Trait of Mature Tissues, Not an Innate Feature of Newly Born Cells

Diabetes researchers have found that the ability of insulin-producing beta cells to replicate and respond to elevated glucose concentrations is absent in very young animals and does not appear until after weaning.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Wafers like the one shown here are used to create “organ-on-a-chip” devices to model human tissue (Photo courtesy of Dr. Anurag Mathur, University of California, Berkeley).

Human Heart-on-a-Chip Cultures May Replace Animal Models for Drug Development and Safety Screening

Human heart cells growing in an easily monitored silicon chip culture system may one day replace animal-based model systems for drug development and safety screening. Drug discovery and development... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel
Image:  Model depiction of a novel cellular mechanism by which regulation of cryptochromes Cry1 and Cry2 enables coordination of a protective transcriptional response to DNA damage caused by genotoxic stress (Photo courtesy of the journal eLife, March 2015, Papp SJ, Huber AL, et al.).

Two Proteins Critical for Circadian Cycles Protect Cells from Mutations

Scientists have discovered that two proteins critical for maintaining healthy day-night cycles also have an unexpected role in DNA repair and protecting cells against genetic mutations that could lead... Read more

Business

view channel

Roche Acquires Signature Diagnostics to Advance Translational Research

Roche (Basel, Switzerland) will advance translational research for next generation sequencing (NGS) diagnostics by leveraging the unique expertise of Signature Diagnostics AG (Potsdam, Germany) in biobanks and development of novel NGS diagnostic assays. Signature Diagnostics is a privately held translational oncology... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.