Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
JIB
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

Full Genetic DNA Data Available in Minutes

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 20 May 2013
Image: Close-up view of the microtip probes of the device (Photo courtesy of NanoFacture).
Image: Close-up view of the microtip probes of the device (Photo courtesy of NanoFacture).
A new device can extract human DNA from a swab of saliva, providing full analysis and genome sequencing data within minutes.

Developed by researchers at the University of Washington (UW, Seattle, WA, USA) and NanoFacture (Bellevue, WA, USA), the new device uses microscopic probes that dip into a fluid sample—saliva, sputum, or blood—and apply an electric field within the liquid that attracts particles to concentrate around the surface of the probe. Larger particles hit the tip and swerve away, but DNA-sized molecules stick to the probe and are trapped on the surface via capillary action. It takes two or three minutes to separate and purify DNA using this technology.

The hand-held device can clean four separate human fluid samples at once, but the technology can be scaled up to prepare 96 samples at a time, which is standard for large-scale handling. Engineers at the University of Washington, which developed the technology, have also designed a pencil-sized device using the same probe technology that could be sent home with patients or distributed to those serving in the military overseas. Patients could swab their cheeks, collect a saliva sample, and process their DNA on the spot to send back to hospitals and labs for analysis.

“It’s very complex to extract DNA,” said lead researcher Jae-Hyun Chung, PhD, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at UW. “When you think of the current procedure, the equivalent is like collecting human hairs using a construction crane.”

Conventional methods use a centrifuge to spin and separate DNA molecules or strain them from a fluid sample with a micro-filter, but these processes take 20 to 30 minutes to complete and can require excessive toxic chemicals. The new device will give hospitals and research labs an easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis, and forensic investigations.

Related Links:

University of Washington
NanoFacture



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: This micrograph depicts the presence of aerobic Gram-negative Neisseria meningitidis diplococcal bacteria; magnification 1150x (Photo courtesy of the CDC - US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

Infection by Meningitis Bacteria Depends on Dimerization State of Certain Host Cell Proteins

A team of molecular microbiologists has untangled the complex three-way interaction between the non-integrin laminin receptor (LAMR1), galectin-3 (Gal-2), and the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel

Molecule in Green Tea Used as Carrier for Anticancer Proteins

A molecule that is a key ingredient in green tea can be employed as a carrier for anticancer proteins, forming a stable and effective therapeutic nanocomplex. This new discovery could help to construct better drug-delivery systems. Some cancer treatments depend on medication comprising the therapeutic drug and a carrier... Read more

Business

view channel

Interest in Commercial Applications for Proteomics Continues to Grow

Increasing interest in the field of proteomics has led to a series of agreements between private proteomic companies and academic institutions as well as deals between pharmaceutical companies and novel proteomics innovator biotech companies. Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.