Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
PZ HTL SA

Computer Simulation and Knotted Chain Technology Yield Virtual Synthetic Proteins

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 28 Feb 2013
Image: The self-knotted structure of the bionic protein (Copyright: Ivan Coluzza).
Image: The self-knotted structure of the bionic protein (Copyright: Ivan Coluzza).
Accessing a powerful computer complex, a team of Austrian physicists has developed virtual synthetic proteins as the first step to the in vitro synthesis of fully active "bionic proteins."

Physicists at the University of Vienna (Austria) together with investigators at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (Vienna, Austria) exploited the computing power of The Vienna Scientific Cluster (Austria)—a pool of high-performance computing resources that covers the computing demands of four different Universities: the University of Vienna, Vienna University of Technology, the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Science, and the Graz University of Technology—to develop a virtual mechanism for the construction of proteins from colloidal particles.

The "knotted chain" methodology, which was fully described in the February 11, 2013, issue of the journal Physical Review Letters, was used to construct self-assembling chains of simple particles, with final structures fully controlled by the sequence of particles along the chain. The individual particles forming the chain were colloids decorated with mutually interacting patches, which can be manufactured in the laboratory with current technology.

The methodology was applied to the design of sequences folding into self-knotting chains, in which the end monomers were by construction always close to each other in space. The knotted structure could then be externally locked simply by controlling the interaction between the end monomers, paving the way to applications in the design and synthesis of active materials and novel carriers for drugs delivery.

"Imitating these astonishing bio-mechanical properties of proteins and transferring them to a fully artificial system is our long term objective,” said first author Dr. Ivan Coluzza, research in the physics department at the University of Vienna.

Related Links:

University of Vienna
University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences
The Vienna Scientific Cluster



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel

New Program Encourages Wide Distribution of Genomic Data

A new data sharing program allows genomics researchers and practitioners to analyze, visualize, and share raw sequence data for individual patients or across populations straight from a local browser. The sequencing revolution is providing the raw data required to identify the genetic variants underlying rare diseases... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: The nano-cocoon drug delivery system is biocompatible, specifically targets cancer cells, can carry a large drug load, and releases the drugs very quickly once inside the cancer cell. Ligands on the surface of the \"cocoon\" trick cancer cells into consuming it. Enzymes (the “worms\" in this image) inside the cocoon are unleashed once inside the cell, destroying the cocoon and releasing anticancer drugs into the cell (Photo courtesy of Dr. Zhen Gu, North Carolina State University).

Novel Anticancer Drug Delivery System Utilizes DNA-Based Nanocapsules

A novel DNA-based drug delivery system minimizes damage to normal tissues by utilizing the acidic microenvironment inside cancer cells to trigger the directed release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX).... Read more

Business

view channel

Interest in Commercial Applications for Proteomics Continues to Grow

Increasing interest in the field of proteomics has led to a series of agreements between private proteomic companies and academic institutions as well as deals between pharmaceutical companies and novel proteomics innovator biotech companies. Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.