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Simple, Portable, Gas Flow Analyzer Provides Immediate Results

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 13 Feb 2013
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 Image: the VT305 gas flow analyzer (Photo courtesy of Fluke Biochemical).
Image: the VT305 gas flow analyzer (Photo courtesy of Fluke Biochemical).
A new gas flow analyzer is a small lightweight instrument, simple to use, and engineered for efficiency.

An intuitive four-button control panel, auto-orienting color LCD screen, and single flow channel are the reason for the simplicity of the VT305. Additionally, the VT305 provides instant readable graphs, which can be saved or transferred using an SD [secure digital] card. The automation provided by the Ansur Test Automation software helps reduce human error, improves data consistency, and ensures compliance with original equipment manufacturer (OEM) requirements. In addition, the VT305 tests ventilators and all other gas flow and pressure-producing devices including anesthesia machines, insufflators, suction devices, pressure gauges, flow meters, etc. The VT305 Gas Flow Analyzer is the efficient, versatile choice for biomeds looking to complete their test and measurement fleet.

Designed for the highly mobile biomed or service engineer, the VT305 Gas Flow Analyzer features internal sensors making connecting to medical devices a fast and easy process, explained Jerry Zion, product manager for Fluke Biomedical (Everett, WA, USA) the company that produces the instrument. He added, "No additional parts are required and the VT305 fits in your hand. You can get instant results in three simple steps. The VT305 will be the portable test tool of choice for highly mobile users."

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Fluke Biomedical

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