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Cell Imaging System Emphasizes Speed and Sensitivity

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 26 Dec 2012
The most recent version of a high-speed cell imaging system designed for both screening and research has now been released to the biotech and life science markets.

The GE Healthcare (Chalfont St. Giles, United Kingdom) IN Cell Analyzer 2200 is a high-speed, flexible, modular imaging system suitable for both investigative microscopy and automated high-content screening of organelles, cells, tissues, and whole organisms.

For screening applications a combination of proprietary optics, a choice of large or standard chip camera, and fast hardware and software autofocus capabilities deliver accurate, high-speed imaging. A bright light source reduces exposure times to further maximize speed without compromising image quality and cell health while the rapid image restoration options allow confocal-like images to be obtained.

A variety of innovative imaging features and a wide range of objectives (2 to 100 times) gives exceptional flexibility for real-time research use. The manual microscope mode allows manipulation of images at full size and resolution, in and out zoom capability, and manual settings adjustments (e.g., filters, objectives, and z-height).

The instrument can image a two-colored 96-well plate assay in about 150 seconds and a one-color 1,536 plate in less than 20 minutes. This speed is possible due to a bright, seven-wavelength solid-state light source and scientific-grade CMOS camera coupled with an optimized stage and efficient, easy-to-use control software. Furthermore, the system is designed to maximize the quantitative accuracy of captured images for any sample type, including image restoration for dim samples.

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