Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
JIB
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

Faster 3D Nanoimaging with Full Color Synchrotron Light Under Development

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 27 Jul 2011
Researchers can now see objects more completely and faster at the nanoscale level due to utilizing the full spectrum of synchrotron light, creating avenues for faster three-dimensional (3D) nanoimaging. This new methodology will provide for enhanced nanoimaging for examining biosamples for medical research, improved drug development, and advanced materials for engineering.

Using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL, USA), researchers from the ARC Center of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science (CXS), headquartered at the University of Melbourne, Australia, revealed that by utilizing the full spectrum of colors of the synchrotron, they increased the clarity of biologic samples and obtained a 60-fold increase in the speed of imaging.

Prof. Keith Nugent, a professor of physics at the University of Melbourne and research director of CXS, said the discovery was an exciting development. “Typically for best imaging, researchers need to convert samples to crystals, but this is not always possible in all samples,” he said. “This discovery of utilizing full color synchrotron light to improve precision and speed of imaging has huge potential in the field.”

The international project was led by Dr. Brian Abbey of the University of Melbourne’s School of Physics and CXS, whose team made the discovery. “We will now be able to see things in detail at the nanoscale much more easily. It is like going from an old film camera to the latest digital SLR. The increase in speed, in particular, opens the way for us to see things faster in 3D at the nanoscale, which has previously taken an impracticably long time,” Dr. Abbey said.

The study was published in the July 2011 issue of the journal Nature Photonics.

Related Links:
Advanced Photon Source
ARC Center of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: Differences in the structure of a small lung artery (top row) and heart cross section (lower row) of rodents without disease (far left column); with pulmonary hypertension (middle) and a diseased rodent treated with the HDL peptide (right). Note the much narrowed lung artery, and thick walls and larger chamber of the heart in the diseased animal and improvements with 4F peptide treatment (Photo courtesy of UCLA - University of California, Los Angeles).

Apolipoprotein A-1 Mimetic Peptide Reverses Pulmonary Hypertension in Rodent Models

A small peptide that mimics the activity of apolipoprotein A-1 (apo A-1), the main protein component of the high density lipoproteins (HDL), counteracted the effects of oxidized lipids and alleviated symptoms... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: (Left) Neurons in brains from people with autism do not undergo normal pruning during childhood and adolescence. The images show representative neurons from unaffected brains (left) and brains from autistic patients (right); the spines on the neurons indicate the location of synapses (Photo courtesy of Guomei Tang, PhD and Mark S. Sonders, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center).

Autistic Youngsters Found to Have Too Many Brain Synapses

Autistic children and adolescents have been shown to have an excess of brain synapses, and this is due to a slowdown in the normal brain “trimming” process during development, according to new findings.... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Hair follicle (blue) being attacked by T cells (green) (Photo courtesy of Christiano Lab/Columbia University Medical Center).

Hair Restoration Method Clones Patients’ Cells to Grow New Hair Follicles

Researchers have developed of a new hair restoration approach that uses a patient’s cells to grow new hair follicles. In addition, the [US] Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) recently approved a new drug... Read more

Business

view channel

Partnership Established to Decode Bowel Disease

23andMe (Mountain View, CA,USA), a personal genetics company, is collaborating with Pfizer, Inc. (New York, NY, USA), in which the companies will seek to enroll 10,000 people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a research project designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity,... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.