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Transformative New System Brings Whole Genome Sequencing to the Desktop

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 30 Jan 2014
Image: The NextSeq 500 System from Illumina, capable of sequencing a whole human genome in a single run, delivers the power of high-throughput sequencing with the simplicity of a desktop sequencer (Photo courtesy of Illumina).
Image: The NextSeq 500 System from Illumina, capable of sequencing a whole human genome in a single run, delivers the power of high-throughput sequencing with the simplicity of a desktop sequencer (Photo courtesy of Illumina).
A new sequencer transforms high-throughput performance into an affordable desktop form factor, enabling users to perform applications more quickly and conveniently.

Illumina (San Diego, CA, USA) now adds the NextSeq 500 System to its next-generation sequencing (NGS) portfolio. The NextSeq 500 System, currently priced at USD 250,000, delivers the flexible power of high-throughput sequencing with the load-and-go simplicity of a desktop sequencer, effectively transforming a broad range of high-throughput applications into affordable, everyday research tools.

“Illumina’s sequencing portfolio is the most comprehensive in the world, and the addition of the NextSeq 500 System furthers this distinction by enabling next-generation sequencing to become an everyday tool,” said Jay Flatley, CEO, Illumina; “The NextSeq 500 was reimagined from the ground up and uses technology breakthroughs in optics, fluidics and chemistry to bring high throughput power to the desktop at a significantly reduced cost.”

Its push-button operation delivers a one-day turnaround for several sequencing applications, including one whole human genome and up to 16 exomes, up to 20 noninvasive prenatal testing samples, up to 20 transcriptomes, up to 48 gene expression samples and up to 96 targeted panels. With its streamlined informatics, sequencing data can be run through a range of open source or commercial pipelines, or instantly transferred, analyzed, and stored securely in "BaseSpace,” or in the new "BaseSpace OnSite" for researchers needing an on premises solution.

Users also have the flexibility to switch to lower throughput sequencing as needed, and while other platforms require several pieces of specialized equipment, the NextSeq 500 System integrates cluster generation and sequencing into a single instrument. Data is generated in as little as 12 hours for a 75-cycle sequencing run and less than 30 hours for paired 150-cycle reads. The new system is supported by the full suite of Illumina sample preparation and target enrichment solutions, offering library compatibility across the entire Illumina sequencing portfolio. Its configurable output supports a wide range of applications and sample sizes with the accuracy of Illumina sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) technology.

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