Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH MEDIA

Genetic Barcode Helping Make Sense of Deluge of Genetic Data

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 23 Dec 2013
An enhanced internet research application is helping clinicians and cancer researchers make sense out of a flood of genetic data from close to 100,000 patients and more than 50,000 lab mice.

The tool, called the Gene Expression Barcode 3.0, is will be a key resource in the new age of personalized medicine, in which cancer therapies are customized to the genetic composition of an individual patient’s tumor.

Significant new improvements in the Gene Expression Barcode 3.0 were reported in the January 2014 issue of the journal Nucleic Acids Research, published online December 2013 ahead of print. The senior author Dr. Michael J. Zilliox is from the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine (IL, USA) and the co-inventor of the Gene Expression Barcode.

“The tool has two main advantages,” Dr. Zilliox said. “It’s fast and it’s free.” The Gene Expression Barcode is available online (please see Related Links below), and designed and hosted by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. The website is receiving 1,600 unique visitors monthly.

Determining how a patient’s cancer genes are expressed can help a clinician put together a pursonlized treatment. In a tumor cell, for example, certain genes are expressed while other genes are unexpressed. Moreover, different kinds of cancer cells have different patterns of gene expression. Genes are expressed through RNA, a nucleic acid that performs as a messenger to carry out instructions from DNA for making proteins.

Research institutions have made public genetic data from nearly 100,000 patients, most of whom had cancer, and more than 50,000 laboratory mice. However, in raw form, these data are too cumbersome to be of much practical use for most researchers. The Gene Expression Barcode employs sophisticated statistical methods to make this huge amount of data much more user-friendly to researchers.

The barcode algorithm is designed to estimate the genes that are expressed and those unexpressed.  The Gene Expression Barcode is binary coded: the expressed genes are ones and the unexpressed genes are zeroes.

Dr. Zilliox co-invented the Gene Expression Barcode, with Rafael Irizarry, Ph.D. Dr. Zilliox and Irizarry first reported the Gene Expression Barcode in 2007. In 2011, they reported an improved 2.0 version. The Barcode already has been cited in more than 120 scientific articles, and the new 3.0 version will make it even easier and faster for researchers to use, according to Dr. Zilliox.

Related Links:

Gene Expression Barcode
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine



Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: The photo shows a mouse pancreatic islet as seen by light microscopy. Beta cells can be recognized by the green insulin staining. Glucagon is labeled in red and the nuclei in blue (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

Regenerative Potential Is a Trait of Mature Tissues, Not an Innate Feature of Newly Born Cells

Diabetes researchers have found that the ability of insulin-producing beta cells to replicate and respond to elevated glucose concentrations is absent in very young animals and does not appear until after weaning.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Wafers like the one shown here are used to create “organ-on-a-chip” devices to model human tissue (Photo courtesy of Dr. Anurag Mathur, University of California, Berkeley).

Human Heart-on-a-Chip Cultures May Replace Animal Models for Drug Development and Safety Screening

Human heart cells growing in an easily monitored silicon chip culture system may one day replace animal-based model systems for drug development and safety screening. Drug discovery and development... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel
Image:  Model depiction of a novel cellular mechanism by which regulation of cryptochromes Cry1 and Cry2 enables coordination of a protective transcriptional response to DNA damage caused by genotoxic stress (Photo courtesy of the journal eLife, March 2015, Papp SJ, Huber AL, et al.).

Two Proteins Critical for Circadian Cycles Protect Cells from Mutations

Scientists have discovered that two proteins critical for maintaining healthy day-night cycles also have an unexpected role in DNA repair and protecting cells against genetic mutations that could lead... Read more

Business

view channel

Roche Acquires Signature Diagnostics to Advance Translational Research

Roche (Basel, Switzerland) will advance translational research for next generation sequencing (NGS) diagnostics by leveraging the unique expertise of Signature Diagnostics AG (Potsdam, Germany) in biobanks and development of novel NGS diagnostic assays. Signature Diagnostics is a privately held translational oncology... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.