Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
PZ HTL SA

Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Are More Potent Immunomodulators Than Those Derived from Bone Marrow

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 04 Jun 2013
A recent paper revealed that stem cells derived from fat (adipose) tissue were more potent than those originating from bone marrow as modulators of the body’s immune system.

Considering that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (AT-SCs) are far more plentiful in the body than those found in bone marrow (BM-MSCs), the findings reported by investigators at the Leiden University Medical Center (The Netherlands) should prompt further research into the use of AT-SCs in personalized immunomodulatory therapy.

The investigators compared the immunomodulatory capacities of BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs derived from age-matched donors. They reported in the May 21, 2013, online edition of the journal STEM CELLS Translational Medicine that BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs shared a similar immunophenotype and capacity for in vitro multilineage differentiation.

BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs showed comparable immunomodulatory effects as they were both able to suppress proliferation of stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to inhibit differentiation of monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells. However, at equal cell numbers, the AT-MSCs showed more potent immunomodulatory effects in both assays as compared with BM-MSCs. Moreover, AT-MSCs showed a higher level of secretion of cytokines that have been implicated in the immunomodulatory modes of action of multipotent stromal cells, such as interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta-1).

AT-MSCs displayed higher metabolic activity than BM-MSCs, which meant that lower numbers of AT-MSCs could evoke the same level of immunomodulation as higher numbers of BM-MSCs.





comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: The nano-cocoon drug delivery system is biocompatible, specifically targets cancer cells, can carry a large drug load, and releases the drugs very quickly once inside the cancer cell. Ligands on the surface of the \"cocoon\" trick cancer cells into consuming it. Enzymes (the “worms\" in this image) inside the cocoon are unleashed once inside the cell, destroying the cocoon and releasing anticancer drugs into the cell (Photo courtesy of Dr. Zhen Gu, North Carolina State University).

Novel Anticancer Drug Delivery System Utilizes DNA-Based Nanocapsules

A novel DNA-based drug delivery system minimizes damage to normal tissues by utilizing the acidic microenvironment inside cancer cells to trigger the directed release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX).... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

Experimental Physicists Find Clues into How Radiotherapy Kills Cancer Cells

A new discovery in experimental physics has implications for a better determination of the process in which radiotherapy destroys cancer cells. Dr. Jason Greenwood from Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland) Center for Plasma Physics collaborated with scientists from Italy and Spain on the work on electrons, and published... Read more

Business

view channel

Interest in Commercial Applications for Proteomics Continues to Grow

Increasing interest in the field of proteomics has led to a series of agreements between private proteomic companies and academic institutions as well as deals between pharmaceutical companies and novel proteomics innovator biotech companies. Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.