Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
PZ HTL SA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

New Technology Unveils DNA Replication's Hidden Secrets

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 07 May 2013
Spanish researchers have developed a detailed atlas that characterizes the proteins comprising the replisome, the complex molecular machine that performs DNA replication.

The replisome must first unwind double stranded DNA into two single strands. For each of the resulting single strands, a new complementary sequence of DNA is synthesized. The net result is formation of two new double stranded DNA sequences that are exact copies of the original double stranded DNA sequence.

Some replisome proteins were already known, but the current study utilized a new technology that allowed identification of more proteins needed for DNA replication, opening up new research paths in the field. Investigators at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (Madrid) developed an approach that combined the isolation of proteins on nascent DNA chains with mass spectrometry (iPOND-MS), allowing a comprehensive proteomic characterization of the human replisome and replisome-associated factors. The iPOND method (procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA) can be applied to any proliferating cell type. It relies on the incorporation of a chemical label into newly synthesized DNA. The label can be modified by a chemistry reaction, and proteins linked to the DNA can be isolated and characterized. The Spanish investigators combined iPOND with sensitive mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis.

They reported in the March 28, 2013, issue of the journal Cell Reports that in addition to known replisome components, they had compiled a broad list of proteins that resided in the vicinity of the replisome, some of which were not previously associated with replication. For instance, their data supported a link between DNA replication and the Williams-Beuren syndrome, an autosomal gene deletion disorder involving over 17 genes on chromosome 7 that is characterized by a broad spectrum of abnormalities, and identified the protein ZNF24 (zinc finger protein 24) as a replication factor.

"We suspected that there might be several dozen proteins that control this process meticulously, thus ensuring the correct duplication of our genome as an indispensable step prior to cell division," said senior author Dr. Óscar Fernández-Capetillo, head of the genomic instability group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre. "The proteins identified have very different activities: they open up the DNA double helix, copy it, repair any breaks if needs be, modify it in different ways, etc. In short, they are all necessary in order to ensure the correct duplication of the DNA and avoid aberrations in the genetic material that form the basis of tumors. If we manage to find fundamental differences between replication in normal cells and in cancer cells, we will surely be able to find new therapeutic targets on which to focus future treatments in the fight against cancer."

Related Links:
Spanish National Cancer Research Center



BIOSIGMA S.R.L.
RANDOX LABORATORIES
SLAS - Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Drug Discovery

view channel

Omega 3 Found to Improve Behavior in Children with ADHD

Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a specific kind of have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Moreover, these findings indicate that a customized cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD. Statistics show that 3%–6%... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: On target: When researchers introduced nanobodies they made to cells engineered to express a tagged version of a protein in skeletal fibers known as tubulin (red), the nanobodies latched on. The cells above have recently divided (Photo courtesy of Rockefeller University).

Turning Antibodies into Precisely Tuned Nanobodies

New technology has the potential to create nanobodies making them much more accessible than antibodies for all sorts of research. Antibodies control the process of recognizing and zooming in on molecular... Read more

Business

view channel

Two Industry Partnerships Initiated to Fuel Neuroscience Research

Faster, more complex neural research is now attainable by combining technology from two research companies. Blackrock Microsystems, LLC (Salt Lake City, UT, USA), a developer of neuroscience research equipment, announced partnerships with two neuroscience research firms—PhenoSys, GmbH (Berlin, Germany) and NAN Instruments, Ltd.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.