Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH MEDIA

Mouse Explants Generated from Patients' Circulating Tumor Cells Pave Way for Directed Personalized Chemotherapy

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 19 Jun 2014
Image: Histopathologic image of small-cell lung cancer (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).
Image: Histopathologic image of small-cell lung cancer (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).
Cancer researchers have isolated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and implanted them into immunocompromised mice to use as a model system for developing better treatments for the disease.

SCLC is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor with early dissemination and poor prognosis that accounts for 15%–20% of lung cancer cases and approximately 200,000 deaths in the United Kingdom each year. Most cases are inoperable, and biopsies to investigate SCLC biology are rarely obtainable. A more promising approach for studying SCLC is by collecting "liquid biopsy" specimens—CTCs, which are prevalent in the blood of SCLC patients.

Investigators at the University of Manchester (United Kingdom) reported in June 1, 2014, online edition of the journal Nature Medicine that CTCs from SCLC patients who either responded to chemotherapy or failed to respond to chemotherapy developed into tumors in immunocompromised mice. The resultant CTC-derived explants (CDXs) mirrored the donor patient's response to platinum and etoposide chemotherapy. Genomic analysis of isolated CTCs revealed considerable similarity to the corresponding CDX.

Senior author Dr. Caroline Dive, professor of pharmacology and pharmacy at the University of Manchester, said, “Access to sufficient tumor tissue is a major barrier to fully understanding the biology of SCLC. This liquid biopsy is straightforward and not invasive so can be easily repeated and will allow us to study the genetics of each lung cancer patient’s individual tumor. It also means that we may have a feasible way of monitoring patient response to therapy, hopefully allowing us to personalize and tailor individual treatment plans to each patient. We can use these models to help us understand why so many SCLC patients acquire resistance to chemotherapy and to search for and test potential new targeted treatments.”

Related Links:

University of Manchester



WATERS CORPORATION

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: Exosomes loaded with catalase (shown in red) efficiently interact with neurons (shown in black) to protect them from the effects of Parkinson\'s disease (Photo courtesy of Dr. Elena Batrakova, University of North Carolina).

Exome Delivery of the Anti-Oxidant Catalase Reduces Parkinson's Disease Symptoms in Mouse Model

The exosome delivery of the antioxidant enzyme catalase was shown to dramatically reduce symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in a mouse model. Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles that are present in... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: The gene assembly robot, the GeneTheatre (Photo courtesy of Analytik Jena AG).

Genomic Research Laboratories Await New Compact Liquid Handling System

A small footprint benchtop liquid handler that automates multiple gene assembly tasks and associated procedures such as PCR setup is now available for use by biotech and genomic research laboratories.... Read more

Business

view channel

NanoString and MD Anderson Collaborate on Development of Novel Multi-Omic Expression Profiling Assays for Cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA) and NanoString Technologies, Inc. (Seattle, WA, USA) will partner on development of a revolutionary new type of assay—simultaneously profiling gene and protein expression, initially aiming to discover and validate biomarker signatures for immuno-oncology... Read more
 

Events

27 May 2015 - 28 May 2015
02 Jun 2015 - 03 Jun 2015
15 Jun 2015 - 18 Jun 2015
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.