Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
PZ HTL SA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Verteporfin Blocks Growth of Deadly Eye Melanoma

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 08 Jun 2014
Image: An untreated uveal melanoma tumor (left) covers entire eye of a mouse. A tumor treated with verteporfin (right) is much smaller and much of the structure of the mouse\'s eye is visible (Photo courtesy of UCSD - University of California, San Diego).
Image: An untreated uveal melanoma tumor (left) covers entire eye of a mouse. A tumor treated with verteporfin (right) is much smaller and much of the structure of the mouse\'s eye is visible (Photo courtesy of UCSD - University of California, San Diego).
Simultaneous mutations in two G-protein encoding genes that cause the overexpression of a carcinogenic protein have been linked to the development of uveal melanoma, a deadly cancer of the colored areas of the eye.

Uveal melanoma is a rare cancer that is usually treated by surgical removal of the eye. However, uveal melanoma can spread to the liver, in which case patients typically die within two to eight months after diagnosis.

Genome studies have shown that a mutation in either the GNAQ (guanine nucleotide binding protein, q polypeptide) or GNA11 (guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit alpha-11) genes, which encode the proteins Gq or G11, respectively, are found in about 70% of uveal melanoma tumors.

In the current study, which was published in the May 29, 2014, online edition of the journal Cancer Cell, investigators at the University of California, San Diego (USA) revealed that that these mutations cause the G-proteins to become permanently activated, which results in overexpression of the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Overexpression of YAP protein induces uncontrolled cell growth and inhibits cell death, triggering cancer development. Furthermore, treatment of uveal melanoma tumors with the YAP inhibitor drug verteporfin blocked tumor growth of cells containing Gq/G11 mutations.

“The beauty of our study is its simplicity,” said senior author Dr. Kun-Liang Guan, professor of pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego. “The genetics of this cancer are very simple and our results have clear implications for therapeutic treatments for the disease. We have a cancer that is caused by a very simple genetic mechanism, and we have a drug that works on this mechanism. The clinical applications are very direct.”

Related Links:

University of California, San Diego



BIOSIGMA S.R.L.
SLAS - Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
RANDOX LABORATORIES
comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Drug Discovery

view channel

Omega 3 Found to Improve Behavior in Children with ADHD

Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a specific kind of have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Moreover, these findings indicate that a customized cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD. Statistics show that 3%–6%... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: Mouse kidneys, liver, and pancreas imaged after treatment with a variety of protocols: a saline solution, Scale, SeeDB (see deep brain), CUBIC, and carotid body (CB) perfusion (which was used in this study) (Photo courtesy of RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center).

Nearly Transparent Mice Offers Potential of Whole-Organism Imaging

Japanese researchers have developed a method that combines tissue decolorization and light-sheet fluorescent microscopy to take extremely detailed images of the interior of individual organs and even entire... Read more

Business

view channel

Two Industry Partnerships Initiated to Fuel Neuroscience Research

Faster, more complex neural research is now attainable by combining technology from two research companies. Blackrock Microsystems, LLC (Salt Lake City, UT, USA), a developer of neuroscience research equipment, announced partnerships with two neuroscience research firms—PhenoSys, GmbH (Berlin, Germany) and NAN Instruments, Ltd.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.