Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
JIB
BioConferenceLive
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

Nanoparticle Therapy Reduces Plaque Inflammation and Lowers Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 06 Feb 2014
Image: A novel HDL nanoparticle (red) loaded with a statin drug, specifically targets and locally treats inflammatory macrophage cells (green) hiding inside high-risk plaque within blood vessels (Photo courtesy of Mount Sinai Medical Center).
Image: A novel HDL nanoparticle (red) loaded with a statin drug, specifically targets and locally treats inflammatory macrophage cells (green) hiding inside high-risk plaque within blood vessels (Photo courtesy of Mount Sinai Medical Center).
Reconstituted HDL (high-density lipoprotein) nanoparticles were used to transport inflammation-retarding statins to atherosclerotic plaques where the drug acted to reduce arterial blockage that could cause heart attack or stroke.

Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. While statins are known to have potent anti-inflammatory properties, they cannot be exploited fully as an oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability.

Investigators at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (New York, NY, USA) sought to concentrate the anti-inflammatory benefits of statins by incorporating them into nanoparticles that would accumulate at sites of inflammation within the blood vessels. For this purpose, they designed an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle capable of delivering statins directly to atherosclerotic plaques.

They reported in the January 20, 2014, online edition of the journal Nature Communications that they had initially demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and showed that this effect was mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. They also applied statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and showed that the nanoparticles accumulated in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affected plaque macrophages. Finally, they demonstrated that a three-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibited plaque inflammation progression, while a one-week high-dose regimen markedly decreased inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques.

“Not only could the HDL nanotherapy potentially avert repeat heart attacks, it may also have the power to reduce recurrent strokes caused by clots in brain arteries, ” said senior author, Dr. Willem Mulder, associate professor of radiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. “We envision that a safe and effective HDL nanotherapy could substantially lower cardiovascular events during the critical period of vulnerability after a heart attack or stroke. While we have much more to do to confirm clinical benefit in patients, our study shows how this nanotherapy functions biologically, and how this novel concept could potentially also work in the clinical setting to solve a critical problem. This nanotherapy would be the first of its kind.”

The optimum use for HDL-statin nanotherapy would be by injection following treatment of an arterial clot. The HDL nanoparticle would deliver the statin directly to macrophages that are driving the inflammatory response. “This could potentially and very rapidly stabilize a dangerous situation,” said Dr. Mulder. “In addition, after discharge, patients would continue to use their oral statins to control LDL in their blood.”

Related Links:

Mount Sinai School of Medicine



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: In the liver tissue of obese animals with type II diabetes, unhealthy, fat-filled cells are prolific (small white cells, panel A). After chronic treatment through FGF1 injections, the liver cells successfully lose fat and absorb sugar from the bloodstream (small purple cells, panel B) and more closely resemble cells of normal, non-diabetic animals (Photo courtesy of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies).

Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 Treatment Restores Glucose Control in Mouse Diabetes Model

A "vaccine" based on the metabolic regulator fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) removed the insulin resistance that characterizes type II diabetes and restored the body's natural ability to manage its glucose... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: This type of electronic pacemaker could become obsolete if induction of biological pacemaker cells by gene therapy proves successful (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

Gene Therapy Induces Functional Pacemaker Cells in Pig Heart Failure Model

Cardiovascular disease researchers working with a porcine heart failure model have demonstrated the practicality of using gene therapy to replace implanted electronic pacemakers to regulate heartbeat.... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

Precise Ion Irradiation Dosing Method Developed for Cancer Therapy

Scientists are employing nuclear physics principles to provide more effective approaches to radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. Radiation therapy using heavy ions is best suitable for cancer patients with tumors that are difficult to access, such as in the brain. These particles scarcely damage the penetrated... Read more

Business

view channel

Cancer Immunotherapy Sector Predicted to Surge to USD 9 Billion Across Major Pharma Through 2022

The immunotherapy market will experience substantial growth through 2022, increasing from USD 1.1 billion in 2012 to nearly USD 9 billion in 2022 (corresponding to 23.8% annual growth) in the United Kingdom, United States, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan, according to recent market research. This notable growth... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.