Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
PZ HTL SA
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC

Beta3-Integrin Protein Possible Key to Block Tumor Growth

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 15 Jan 2014
Image: Graphic of Cytoplasmic domain of the integrin beta-3 (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons).
Image: Graphic of Cytoplasmic domain of the integrin beta-3 (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons).
A protein that has been at the forefront of cancer drug development for the last 20 years should not be given up on according to new findings by British investigators.

The most advanced version of αvβ3-integrin antagonists was unsuccessful in clinical trials to treat aggressive forms of brain cancer. However, research published January 3, 2014, in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation Research revealed that targeting the specific protein could still be key to blocking tumor growth. Most significantly, the drugs targeting the protein cause minimal side effects compared to other drugs, which can cause high blood pressure and bleeding in the gut.

Tumors must recruit their own blood supply to grow beyond a very small size. The researchers examined the cells that line blood vessels (endothelial cells) in mice, and specifically the role of a widely expressed protein called beta3-integrin.

Dr. Stephen Robinson, from the University of East Anglia’s (UEA; Norwich, UK) School of Biological Sciences, said, “This protein has been the focus of drug design over the last two decades because its expression is vastly increased in endothelial cells during blood vessel recruitment. The most advanced of these drugs, however, has recently failed a phase III clinical trial to treat an aggressive form of brain cancer. In line with other clinical work, patients respond to treatment for a short while but then their cancers escape the treatment. This research helps to explain why these very promising drugs aren’t meeting with the success that was anticipated and it suggests a way forward—how to make them work better.”

The study authors additionally reported that they revealed how tumors continue to grow in spite of treatment that should suppress blood vessel recruitment. In this study, they modulated how they are recruiting their blood vessels by using a different pathway from the one that is being targeted. They have identified some molecular alterations in endothelial cells that occur with long-term suppression of beta3-integrin that might help the cells evade the beta3-integrin blockade.

Dr. Robinson continued, “Our research also shows that timing is critical when targeting the protein beta3-integrin. Importantly, these findings have reestablished the expression of beta3-integrin as a valid clinical target when treating cancer. Efforts must now be refocused to either develop new drugs to target beta3-integrin, or figure out how to more effectively use the drugs that already exist.”

Related Links:

University of East Anglia



RANDOX LABORATORIES
SLAS - Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
BIOSIGMA S.R.L.
comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: A 3-dimensional picture reveals how the antibodies in the experimental drug Zmapp bind to Ebola virus (Photo courtesy of the Scripps Research Institute).

Electron Microscope Imaging Shows How Experimental Anti-Ebola Drug Works

Electron microscope imaging has revealed how the experimental drug ZMapp binds to the Ebolavirus and provides insights into how the drug prevents growth of the pathogen. ZMapp, which was developed by... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel

Blocking Enzyme Switch Turns Off Tumor Growth in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Researchers recently reported that blocking the action of an enzyme “switch” needed to activate tumor growth is emerging as a practical strategy for treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. An estimated 25% of the 500 US adolescents and young adults diagnosed yearly with this aggressive disease fail to respond to... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

e-Incubator Technology Provides Real-Time Imaging of Bioengineered Tissues in a Controlled Unit

A new e-incubator, an innovative miniature incubator that is compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enables scientists to grow tissue-engineered constructs under a controlled setting and to study their growth and development in real time without risk of contamination or damage. Offering the potential to test... Read more

Business

view channel

Two Industry Partnerships Initiated to Fuel Neuroscience Research

Faster, more complex neural research is now attainable by combining technology from two research companies. Blackrock Microsystems, LLC (Salt Lake City, UT, USA), a developer of neuroscience research equipment, announced partnerships with two neuroscience research firms—PhenoSys, GmbH (Berlin, Germany) and NAN Instruments, Ltd.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.