Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH MEDIA

Monoclonal Antibody Blocks Pro-Life Molecular Signaling in Pancreatic Tumors

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 29 Jul 2013
 Image: CTGF biology (Photo courtesy of Fibrogen, Inc).
Image: CTGF biology (Photo courtesy of Fibrogen, Inc).
A monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) slows the progress of pancreatic tumors by decreasing the activity of XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis), a protein that promotes cancer cell survival.

CTGF causes a variety of cellular responses including reduced cell adhesion and enhanced cell migration and proliferation. CTGF has also been shown to be essential for epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process whereby normal functioning cells morph into ones that produce mainly scar tissue (of which collagen in the major protein component). Cellular responses to CTGF also have effects at the tissue level including remodeling, formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), changes in blood vessel architecture (permeability and stiffness), and replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue.

Treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is hampered by poor tissue perfusion that restricts the amount of drug able to reach the tumor. Furthermore, cells in the tumor microenvironment produce molecules, such as CTGF, that provide "pro-life" cues that promote drug resistance in the cancer cells.

Investigators at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (NY, USA) used a mouse pancreatic cancer model to study the impact on tumor growth caused by the interaction between CTGF and Fibrogen Inc.'s (San Francisco, CA, USA) CTGF-specific monoclonal antibody, FG-3019.

They reported in the July 8, 2013, online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) that pancreatic tumors in mice treated with FG-3019 in combination with the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine stopped growing. The response to FG-3019 correlated with the decreased expression of a previously described promoter of chemotherapy resistance, the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein.

"In addition to drug delivery being a problem, there is also this nurturing aspect that prevents cancer cells responding to the drugs," said senior author Dr. David A. Tuveson, professor of medical oncology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. "Both CTGF and XIAP have been shown to be present in human pancreatic cancer tumors so combination therapy using antagonists of either molecule could be a feasible approach."

Related Links:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Fibrogen Inc.



Channels

Biochemistry

view channel

Possible New Target Found for Treating Brain Inflammation

Scientists have identified an enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited eurodegenerative disorder, and that disorder now may be treatable if researchers can develop suitable drug candidates that suppress this enzyme.... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Cancer cells infected with tumor-targeted oncolytic virus (red). Green indicates alpha-tubulin, a cell skeleton protein. Blue is DNA in the cancer cell nuclei (Photo courtesy of Dr. Rathi Gangeswaran, Bart’s Cancer Institute).

Innovative “Viro-Immunotherapy” Designed to Kill Breast Cancer Cells

A leading scientist has devised a new treatment that employs viruses to kill breast cancer cells. The research could lead to a promising “viro-immunotherapy” for patients with triple-negative breast cancer,... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: MIT researchers have designed a microfluidic device that allows them to precisely trap pairs of cells (one red, one green) and observe how they interact over time (Photo courtesy of Burak Dura, MIT).

New Device Designed to See Communication between Immune Cells

The immune system is a complicated network of many different cells working together to defend against invaders. Effectively combating an infection depends on the interactions between these cells.... Read more

Business

view channel

Program Designed to Provide High-Performance Computing Cluster Systems for Bioinformatics Research

Dedicated Computing (Waukesha, WI, USA), a global technology company, reported that it will be participating in the Intel Cluster Ready program to deliver integrated high-performance computing cluster solutions to the life sciences market. Powered by Intel Xeon processors, Dedicated Computing is providing a range of... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.