Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Demo Company

Positively Charged Anticancer Nanoparticles Accumulate in the Acidic Microenvironment of a Tumor

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 24 Jul 2013
Print article
Nanoparticles containing an anticancer drug within a weak polybase sphere accumulate inside tumors where the acidic environment promotes their retention and induces swelling, which enhances delivery of the chemotherapeutic load.

Investigators at Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN, USA) coined the term "pH phoresis" to describe the tendency of nanoparticles composed of weak polybases (such as polyamines) to migrate to areas of negative charge when exposed to a pH gradient.

Furthermore, in regions of lower pH—such as in the pH 6.5-6.9 microenvironment surrounding a tumor—increased protonation of the amines in the shell cause them to repel each other, which forces the particles to expand in size. Doubling the size of the particles would, in theory, result in a similar increase in the efficiency of drug delivery to tumors.

"This phenomenon, which we term pH phoresis, may provide a useful mechanism for improving the delivery of drugs to cancer cells in solid tumor tissues," said first author Dr. You-Yeon Won, associate professor of chemical engineering at Purdue University. "Such an effect would be a game changer by delivering the proper dose of anticancer drugs inside tumor cells. This pH phoresis concept also could be combined readily within other established drug-delivery methodologies, making it potentially practical for medical application."

Related Links:
Purdue University

Print article



view channel
Image: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (Photo courtesy of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine).

How Blocking TROY Signaling Slows Brain Cancer Growth

Cancer researchers have found how the low molecular weight drug propentofylline (PPF) slows the growth of the aggressive brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This form of brain cancer is the most... Read more


view channel

Molecular Light Shed on “Dark” Cellular Receptors

Scientists have created a new research tool to help find homes for orphan cell-surface receptors, toward better understanding of cell signaling, developing new therapeutics, and determining causes of drug side-effects. The approach may be broadly useful for discovering interactions of orphan receptors with endogenous, naturally... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: The new ambr 15 fermentation micro-bioreactor system was designed to enhance microbial strain screening applications (Photo courtesy of Sartorius Stedim Biotech).

New Bioreactor System Streamlines Strain Screening and Culture

Biotechnology laboratories working with bacterial cultures will benefit from a new automated micro bioreactor system that was designed to enhance microbial strain screening processes. The Sartorius... Read more


view channel

Purchase of Biopharmaceutical Company Will Boost Development of Nitroxyl-Based Cardiovascular Disease Drugs

A major international biopharmaceutical company has announced the acquisition of a private biotech company that specializes in the development of drugs for treatment of cardiovascular disease. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (New York, NY, USA) has initiated the process to buy Cardioxyl Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Chapel Hill, NC, USA).... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2015 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.