Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
JIB

Mushrooms Help Raise Vitamin D Levels

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 07 May 2013
Eating mushrooms may be as effective at raising serum vitamin D levels as taking vitamin D2 or D3 supplements, according to a new study.

Researchers at Boston University (MA, USA) conducted a study that randomized 30 adults (mean age 35.2), to one of three interventions taken once a day for 12 weeks during the winter. The first involved capsules containing 2,000 IU of vitamin D3; the second involved capsules containing 2,000 IU of vitamin D2; while the third involved extract of dried white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) containing 2,000 IU of vitamin D2. All patients had similar baseline levels of serum vitamin 25(OH)D. In all, 25 patients completed all 12 weeks of the study.

The results showed that serum vitamin D levels gradually increased until they reached a plateau at about 7 weeks for all three groups, and were maintained for the next 5 weeks. According to the researchers, the results confirm other studies that have shown eating vitamin D2—as fortified orange juice, a supplement, or a pharmaceutical formulation--can increase total circulating serum D levels for at least 3 months, and up to 6 years. The study was presented at the joint American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Experimental Biology meeting, held during April 2013 in Boston (MA, USA).

“These results provide evidence that ingesting mushrooms […] can improve the vitamin D status of healthy adults,” said lead author and study presenter Michael Holick, MD, PhD. “Exposing mushrooms to ultraviolet light can produce vitamins D3 and D4 as well, giving patients additional vitamin D.”

Mushrooms produce vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) when exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet radiation, in a similar process by which humans produce vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Not all plants possess this property, but fungi, seaweed, and yeast do. Clinicians recommend vitamin D3 supplements, particularly for those who are vitamin D deficient or insufficient, but studies have shown vitamin D2 to be effective at increasing serum levels of the vitamin as well.

Related Links:

Boston University



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: This type of electronic pacemaker could become obsolete if induction of biological pacemaker cells by gene therapy proves successful (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

Gene Therapy Induces Functional Pacemaker Cells in Pig Heart Failure Model

Cardiovascular disease researchers working with a porcine heart failure model have demonstrated the practicality of using gene therapy to replace implanted electronic pacemakers to regulate heartbeat.... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel
Image: The DrySyn MULTI converts any standard hotplate stirrer into a high performance reaction block (Photo courtesy of Asynt).

New Reaction Vessel Heating System Is Cleaner and Safer

Biotech and other life science researchers can create a safer, cleaner, and more efficient working environment in their laboratories by switching from oil bath-based heating of reaction vessels to a new... Read more

Business

view channel

Global Computational Biology Sector Expected to Reach over USD 4 Billion by 2020

The global market for computational biology is expected to reach USD 4.285 billion by 2020 growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21.1%, according to new market research. Steady surge in the usage and application of computational biology for bioinformatics R&D programs designed for sequencing genomes... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.