Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
JIB
BioConferenceLive
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

Misuse of Antibiotics May Spur Bacterial Acquisition of Drug Resistance

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 18 Mar 2013
Petri dish with bacterial colonies growing in a hazardous substrate (Photo courtesy of Dr. Mohammed Bakkali, Department of Genetics, University of Granada).
Petri dish with bacterial colonies growing in a hazardous substrate (Photo courtesy of Dr. Mohammed Bakkali, Department of Genetics, University of Granada).
A recent paper reviewed the scientific literature regarding acquisition of drug resistance by bacteria and advanced the theory that in most cases resistance is transferred by uptake of DNA that had been released by resistant organisms that had been broken open by the stress of antibiotic treatment.

The author, Dr. Mohammed Bakkali, professor of genetics at the University of Granada (Spain) reviewed some of the literature on bacterial acquisition of drug resistance and discussed four hypotheses on how and why bacteria take up DNA. He argued in the February 5, 2013, online edition of the journal Archives of Microbiology that DNA uptake by bacteria is an accidental by-product of bacterial adhesion and twitching motility. Adhesion and motility are generally increased in stressful conditions, which may explain why bacteria increase DNA uptake in these conditions.

This hypothesis has significant clinical implications and finds further support from the fact that antibiotics sometimes fail to eliminate the targeted bacterium while inevitably causing stress to others. The widespread misuse of antibiotics may thus not only be selecting for resistant strains, but may also be causing bacteria to take up more DNA with the consequent increase in the chances of acquiring drug resistance and virulence.

"Our current indiscriminate use of antibiotics not only selects the resistant bacteria, but also means that the bacteria take up more DNA, due to their increased motility in response to the stress that the antibiotic subjects them to," said Dr. Bakkali. "In this way, the nonresistant bacteria become resistant completely by accident on ingesting this DNA and can even become much more virulent, partly due to the stress we subject them to when we make an abusive use of antibiotics."

Related Links:

University of Granada



comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: Microcomputed tomography images (top) and histology images (bottom) of the knees of mice fed a very high fat diet containing omega-3 fatty acid supplement (left) or only omega-6 fatty acids (right) after a knee injury. The omega-6 diet showed abnormal bone remodeling and calcified tissue formation in the joint (white arrow). The omega-6 diet also showed significant loss of cartilage (red staining, yellow arrowhead) and increased joint inflammation (Photo courtesy of Duke University).

Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Moderate Severity of Osteoarthritis in a Mouse Model

Researchers working with an osteoarthritis (OA) obese mouse model found that the fat content of the animals' diet contributed more to the development or arrest of OA than did body weight.... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel

Vaccine Being Developed for Heart Disease Close to Reality

The world’s first vaccine for heart disease is becoming a possibility with researchers demonstrating significant arterial plaque reduction in concept testing in mice. Klaus Ley, MD, from the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (LA Jolla, CA, USA), and a vascular immunology specialist, is leading the vaccine... Read more

Business

view channel

A Surge in IPOs Revitalize Investments for the Global Pharma and Biotech

Anti-infective drugs, oncology, and pharmaceutical contract laboratories attract the most investment up to now. The intensified private equity and venture capital (PEVC) deal activity in the global healthcare industry during the recession years, 2008–2010, witnessed a waning post-2010. However, the decline in deals... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.