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Sonrgy in Licensing Agreement with UC San Diego for Drug Delivery Nanotech

By Doris Mendieta
Posted on 17 Feb 2014
Sonrgy, Inc. (San Diego, CA, USA), a biotechnology company developing focused drug delivery technologies, has obtained an exclusive license agreement with the University of California (UC; USA) for the company’s core technology, an ultrasound-sensitive drug delivery platform.

The agreement gives the company the sole rights to develop and market the technology worldwide. Protecting the basic technology will establish a significant barrier to potential competitors, and is a vital step towards bringing the platform to the clinic.

Based on research conducted in the lab of Prof. Sadik Esener at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center (USA), “the SonRx technology addresses longstanding challenges related to stability and controlled release in nanoscale drug delivery,” stated Dr. Michael Benchimol, Sonrgy’s chief technology officer. “We are excited to initiate the next steps of its commercial development.”

Sonrgy is a preclinical stage biotechnology company that is developing a targeted chemotherapy delivery platform to improve survival and quality of life for millions of cancer patients. Sonrgy’s tiny nanocarriers safely transport potent chemotherapy drugs to cancer tumors and release high doses on command in response to a focused beam of ultrasound. These carriers convey drugs directly at the tumor cell sites, avoiding the many serious side effects of toxic chemotherapy circulating in the blood stream.

Nanocarriers can deliver chemotherapy before surgery to reduce tumor size, after surgery to prevent recurrence, and in settings when surgery cannot block tumor growth. This distinctive approach to delivering chemotherapy can be applied to many tumors and it enables a more intensive treatment of the cancer, potentially optimizing effectiveness while reducing harmful effects on the rest of the body.

Related Links:

University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center
Sonrgy



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