Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
JIB
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING

Growth Factors Identified for Current Orphan Drug Market

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 08 Jul 2013
A new market research report by Kalorama Information (Rockville, MD, USA) identifies factors likely to have stimulated the current orphan drug market, with further growth expected for the next forecast period.

Drugs for treating rare conditions are commonly referred to as "orphan drugs." The global orphan drug market reached 61 billion in 2012, according to Kalorama. The new Kalorama report - "The World Market for Orphan Drugs" - states that the increasing incidence of diseases affecting the aged will drive the market to increase at a rate of 11.5% throughout the forecast period, reaching USD 105.2 billion by 2017. In the USA, the largest market, Congress determined that adequate therapies for many rare diseases had not been developed because companies could not expect an orphan drug to make sufficient profit; therefore, incentives were needed for developing such drugs. According to Kalorama, these incentives have worked, helping to create a thriving market for this sector of treatments.

The report breaks out the market by company and by category. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, renal disease, and osteoporosis are among the diseases where treatments are not sufficient, according to the report. "In these markets regulators have allowed new orphan therapies," said Bruce Carlson, publisher, Kalorama Information, "Pharmaceutical companies have seen an opportunity in developing drugs with reduced regulatory costs and incentivized development."

Kalorama's estimate relates to the market where only orphan drug-designation revenue is included. Other estimates may also include brand revenue not truly occurring from an orphan designation. A product available as an orphan drug in one country may be available under traditional marketing approval in another. Some products that gain orphan status are later granted approval and removed from the orphan drug database at the developer's request. Factors involved in also include reimbursement, regulation, disease status, and general development, all of which were taken into account in Kalorama's study.

The report also presents major and small pharmaceutical companies' activities within this drug category, their market share, and predicts leading market contributers.

Related Links:
Kalorama Information
Kalorama Orphan Drugs Report


comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: A leukemia cell coated with antibody is marked for destruction by activated natural killer cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Southern California).

Leukemia Cells Are Killed in Culture by Immune Cells Grown from the Same Patient

Immune system natural killer (NK) cells were isolated from leukemia patients, expanded in culture, and then shown in an in vitro system to attack and destroy cancer cells from the original cell donors.... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells (Photo courtesy of the University of Texas, Austin).

Experimental Drug Kills Cancer Cells by Interfering with Their Ion Transport Mechanism

An experimental anticancer drug induces cells to enter a molecular pathway leading to apoptosis by skewing their ion transport systems to greatly favor the influx of chloride anions. To promote development... Read more

Therapeutics

view channel
Image: Liver cells regenerated in mice treated with a new drug (right) compared with a control group (center) after partial liver removal. Healthy liver cells are shown at left (Photo courtesy of Marshall et al, 2014, the Journal of Experimental Medicine).

New Drug Triggers Liver Regeneration After Surgery

Investigators have revealed that an innovative complement inhibitor decreases complement-mediated liver cell death, and actually stimulates postsurgery liver regrowth in mice. Liver cancer often results... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

White-Matter Deficits Found in Codeine-Containing Cough Syrup Users

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of chronic users of codeine-containing cough syrups (CCS) has found deficits in specific regions of brain white matter and linked these changes with increased impulsivity in codeine-containing cough syrup users. These findings were consistent with findings from earlier research of... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.