Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
RANDOX LABORATORIES

Events

06 Jun 2016 - 09 Jun 2016
22 Jun 2016 - 24 Jun 2016
04 Jul 2016 - 06 Jul 2016

Company Formed to Develop Spore-Based Next-Generation Vaccines

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 06 Nov 2012
Print article
Scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London (London, UK), have developed a pioneering method of vaccination that served as the basis for receiving private seed investment used to form the new company, Holloway Immunology, to further develop the vaccine technology. The company is currently seeking additional investors to help fast track implementation of this new form of vaccine delivery.

Prof. Simon Cutting led the development using probiotic spores. He and his laboratory had been carrying out fundamental biology studies of Bacillus subtilis, which forms spores that can last millions of years before germinating under appropriate conditions. They later found that Bacillus spores can also act as effective vehicles to carry antigens and promote an immune response. "Rather than requiring needle delivery, vaccines based on Bacillus spores can be delivered via a nasal spray, or as an oral liquid or capsule. Alternatively, they can be administered via a small soluble film placed under the tongue [...]. As spores are exceptionally stable, vaccines based on Bacillus do not require cold-chain storage, alleviating a further issue with current vaccine approaches," explained Prof. Cutting. Besides eliminating pain associated with needles, oral vaccines are also safer to administer (especially in developing countries), inexpensive to produce, easier to store, and reduce concerns of adverse reactions.

Prof. Cutting and his team have carried out preclinical evaluation of Bacillus-based vaccines for a number of diseases including tuberculosis (TB), influenza, and tetanus. A Bacillus-based vaccine could boost the immunity provided by, or possibly even replace, existing vaccines against these diseases. They have also begun investigating the potential use of this technology against Clostridium difficile. “There is no vaccine against the disease, and although several approaches are currently undergoing clinical trials, none are expected to provide full protection," said Prof. Cutting. Also, unlike other current approaches, oral delivery can cause a more specific immune response in the gastrointestinal tract to more effectively eliminate C.difficile.

Holloway Immunology will initially concentrate development of the Bacillus spore based technology for three lead vaccines: against TB, influenza, and C. difficile.

Related Links:

Royal Holloway, University of London






Print article

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: A dark field photomicrograph showing the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the pathogen responsible for causing Lyme disease (Photo courtesy of the CDC).

Statins May Help Block Transmission of Lyme Disease

A recent study found that treatment with cholesterol-lowering statins reduced the number of Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria in rodents, which helped to block transmission of Lyme disease. Lyme disease... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel

Experimental Small-Molecule Anticancer Drug Blocks RAS-binding Domains

The experimental small-molecule anticancer drug rigosertib was shown to block tumor growth by acting as an RAS-mimetic and interacting with the RAS binding domains of RAF kinases, resulting in their inability to bind to RAS, which inhibited the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway. Oncogenic activation of RAS genes due to point mutations... Read more

Biochemistry

view channel
Image: A space-filling model of the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

Wastewater May Contaminate Crops with Potentially Dangerous Pharmaceuticals

Reclaimed wastewater used to irrigate crops is contaminated with pharmaceutical residues that can be detected in the urine of those who consumed such produce. Investigators at the Hebrew University... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

Huge Modifiable Biomedical Database to Be Available on the Wikidata Site

Genome researchers are exploiting the power of the open Internet community Wikipedia database to create a comprehensive resource for geneticists, molecular biologists, and other interested life scientists. While efficiency in generating scientific data improves almost daily, applying meaningful relationships between... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2016 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.