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GE Healthcare to Be Sole Distributor of Gyros' Nanoliter-Scale Immunoassay Platform in Japan

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 20 Jul 2011
GE Healthcare Life Sciences (Little Chalfont, UK), a global provider of transformational medical technologies and services, has signed a sole distribution agreement with Gyros AB (Uppsala, Sweden), a developer of microfluidic technologies to miniaturize and automate immunoassays. Under the agreement, GE Healthcare becomes the sole distributor of the Gyros nanoliter-scale immunoassay platform in Japan.

Major biopharmaceutical companies and their service providers use the Gyros platform worldwide to improve productivity and efficiency when developing biotherapeutics and vaccines, generating time-critical workflows to meet regulatory demands.

Erik Walldén, CEO at Gyros, said, “The growing acceptance of our nanoliter-scale immunoassay platform within the global biopharmaceutical industry makes it imperative that we are represented within the Japanese market. We believe that this agreement with GE Healthcare Life Sciences will be a key factor in our success. As well as the clear commercial synergy between our product portfolios, we can be sure of providing the highest standards of service and support for our Japanese customers. We look forward to a highly successful collaboration.”

Hiroko Watanabe, general manager GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Japan, added, “We are delighted to have signed this agreement with Gyros which will help us expand our offering of value-added and innovative technologies to the biopharmaceutical industry in Japan. The Gyros immunoassay platform offers manufacturers of biopharmaceuticals and vaccines the potential to make substantial improvements in productivity and is an excellent complement to our own extensive range of analytical technologies for the biopharmaceutical industry.”

Related Links:

GE Healthcare Life Sciences
Gyros



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