Features Partner Sites Information LinkXpress
Sign In
Advertise with Us
RANDOX LABORATORIES

Events

10 May 2016 - 16 May 2016
11 May 2016 - 13 May 2016

Blocking Cell Movement Explored to Stop the Spread of Cancer

By BiotechDaily International staff writers
Posted on 14 Jul 2014
Print article
Image: Migrating embryonic neural crest cells (Photo courtesy of UCL - University College London).
Image: Migrating embryonic neural crest cells (Photo courtesy of UCL - University College London).
Learning more about how cells travel through the body could lead to innovative new treatments to block cancer cells from metastasizing and causing secondary tumors, according to new research.

Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily move through the thin channels in the human body. This transformation is activated by chemical signals, which could be blocked to stop cancer cells from spreading. Most cancer deaths are not caused by to primary tumors, but to secondary tumors in major organs, such as the lungs or brain, caused by cells moving from the original tumor to other places in the body.

The study led by the University College London (UCL; UK) researchers and published July 8, 2014, in the Journal of Cell Biology, used embryonic cells to better determine how groups of cells move in a developmental process similar to that exploited by cancer to spread around the body. The scientists reported that a molecule called lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) transforms cells from a solid-like to a liquid-like state, allowing cells to flow between normal tissues in the body. They were able to turn off the signals from LPA, stopping the cells from moving down the narrow, blood vessel-like channels.

Lead scientist Prof. Roberto Mayor, from the UCL department of cell and developmental biology, said, “We have found a way to stop the movement of embryonic cells by blocking LPA signals. It is likely that a similar mechanism operates during cancer invasion, which suggests a possible alternative which cancer treatments might work in the future, if therapies can be targeted to limit the tissue fluidity of tumors. Our findings are important for the fields of cell, developmental and cancer biology. Previously, we thought cells only moved around the body either individually or as groups of well-connected cells. What we have discovered is a hybrid state where cells loosen their links to neighboring cells but still move en masse together, like a liquid. Moreover, we can stop this movement.”

Related Links:

University College London



Print article

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel
Image: An artistic rendering of the Zika virus structure (Photo courtesy of Dr. Guntur Fibriansah, Duke-NUS Medical School).

High Resolution Structure of Zika virus Expected to Aid Vaccine Development

A team of molecular virologists used advanced cryo-electron microscopy techniques to establish a high-resolution structure for the Zika virus, a formerly neglected pathogen that has recently been associated... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel

Experimental Small-Molecule Anticancer Drug Blocks RAS-binding Domains

The experimental small-molecule anticancer drug rigosertib was shown to block tumor growth by acting as an RAS-mimetic and interacting with the RAS binding domains of RAF kinases, resulting in their inability to bind to RAS, which inhibited the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway. Oncogenic activation of RAS genes due to point mutations... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

Huge Modifiable Biomedical Database to Be Available on the Wikidata Site

Genome researchers are exploiting the power of the open Internet community Wikipedia database to create a comprehensive resource for geneticists, molecular biologists, and other interested life scientists. While efficiency in generating scientific data improves almost daily, applying meaningful relationships between... Read more

Business

view channel

European Biotech Agreement to Promote Antigen-Drug Conjugation Technology

Two European biotech companies have joined forces to exploit and commercialize an innovative, site-specific ADC (antigen-drug conjugate) conjugation technology. ProBioGen (Berlin, Germany), a company specializing in the development and manufacture of complex glycoproteins and Eucodis Bioscience (Vienna, Austria), a... Read more
Copyright © 2000-2016 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.