Features | Partner Sites | Information | LinkXpress
Sign In
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
GLOBETECH PUBLISHING LLC
PZ HTL SA

Fine-Tuning Liver Glucose Metabolism

By Biotechdaily staff writers
Posted on 30 Jun 2006
Researchers have traced the biochemical mechanism responsible for modulating the uptake, release, and synthesis of glucose by the liver.

Previous findings had shown that hormonal and nutrient regulation of glucose synthesis in the liver was controlled by modulation of the transcriptional coactivator protein PGC-1-alpha. In the current study, investigators at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD, USA) learned that PGC-1-alpha resides in a multi-protein complex containing the acetyltransferase GCN5. Fine-tuning of glucose metabolism depends on inactivation of PGC-1-alpha by this enzyme and its subsequent sequestering away from the genes it was normally meant to activate.

This mechanism was demonstrated experimentally by using an adenovirus vector to implant the gene for GCN5 into the livers of a group of starved mice. Normally such animals are actively releasing glucose into the blood, but results published in the June 2006 issue of Cell Metabolism showed that glucose release in these genetically engineered animals was significantly reduced.

"These results show that changing GCN5 is sufficient to control the sugar balance in mice,” explained senior author Dr. Pere Puigserver, assistant professor of cell biology at Johns Hopkins University. "Therefore, GCN5 has the potential to be a target for therapeutic drug design in the future. Understanding the ways that energy production and use are controlled is crucial to developing new drugs and therapies.”



Related Links:
Johns Hopkins University

comments powered by Disqus

Channels

Genomics/Proteomics

view channel

New Program Encourages Wide Distribution of Genomic Data

A new data sharing program allows genomics researchers and practitioners to analyze, visualize, and share raw sequence data for individual patients or across populations straight from a local browser. The sequencing revolution is providing the raw data required to identify the genetic variants underlying rare diseases... Read more

Drug Discovery

view channel
Image: The nano-cocoon drug delivery system is biocompatible, specifically targets cancer cells, can carry a large drug load, and releases the drugs very quickly once inside the cancer cell. Ligands on the surface of the \"cocoon\" trick cancer cells into consuming it. Enzymes (the “worms\" in this image) inside the cocoon are unleashed once inside the cell, destroying the cocoon and releasing anticancer drugs into the cell (Photo courtesy of Dr. Zhen Gu, North Carolina State University).

Novel Anticancer Drug Delivery System Utilizes DNA-Based Nanocapsules

A novel DNA-based drug delivery system minimizes damage to normal tissues by utilizing the acidic microenvironment inside cancer cells to trigger the directed release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX).... Read more

Lab Technologies

view channel

Experimental Physicists Find Clues into How Radiotherapy Kills Cancer Cells

A new discovery in experimental physics has implications for a better determination of the process in which radiotherapy destroys cancer cells. Dr. Jason Greenwood from Queen’s University Belfast (Ireland) Center for Plasma Physics collaborated with scientists from Italy and Spain on the work on electrons, and published... Read more

Business

view channel

Interest in Commercial Applications for Proteomics Continues to Grow

Increasing interest in the field of proteomics has led to a series of agreements between private proteomic companies and academic institutions as well as deals between pharmaceutical companies and novel proteomics innovator biotech companies. Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins.... Read more
 
Copyright © 2000-2014 Globetech Media. All rights reserved.